STORAGE ROTS AS A FUNCTION OF CONTACT AREA

STORAGE ROTS AS A FUNCTION OF CONTACT AREA

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WHY:

Rots are responsible for the majority of sugar loss in the later part of long-term storage of sugar beets. I’m pretty sure that the rate of beet-to-beet contact area is different depending on the size of the beets and on time – clamps settle and shrink (I think). So, I’m curious as to whether an increase in surface contact will affect rates of rot. I don’t think this work would lead to any major breakthroughs in the world of sugar beet storage, especially given the majority of damage is at the tops and tips of the beet roots and these surfaces are not smooth, but it just adds another piece to the large puzzle.

HOW:

This is a lab level study. Beets of equal size would be paired up, with both pairs subjected to a given surface damage, e.g. a 1cm diameter circular section of the surface removed with a corer at the widest part of the beet, not in the root furrow. Then one of the pair would be left in the open while the other has a beet placed on the surface such that it covers the damaged area. After ca 400 degree days, rates of rot at the damage sites are assessed. This could be initially done on 50 pairs – so 150 beets needed in the trial.

WHEN:

2021?

COST STAB-IN-THE-DARK:

Just time. About 1 day set up, 0.5 day analysis.

WHY THIS MIGHT NOT HAPPEN:

Time

COMMENT:

A neat little student project.

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